Insights on the Saving Decision and the Journey that Follows

American Savers have recently taken at least one tangible step to start or accelerate their savings. Most have been successful. The behavior and outcome of these savers make them a distinctive subset of the American public, a group we're calling Committed Savers. Profiling these Committed Savers provides valuable insight into what motivates Americans to save money and the unique characteristics and actions of particularly successful savers.

New research by America Saves, in partnership with Artemis Strategy Group, explores who Committed Savers are, what triggered and or/accelerated their savings, what barriers they encountered in their savings journey, what steps they took to overcome these challenges, and how well they succeeded. >> Read more in our press release


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Tip of the Day

  • Save your loose change. Putting aside fifty cents a day over the course of a year will allow you to save nearly 40% of a $500 emergency fund. http://ow.ly/sj972 

Saver Stories View all »

Inspired to Build Savings By Starting Small

With little-to-no money in the bank and living on a limited income with her adult daughter, Sharon wasn’t sure if building up savings for her future was even possible. “At my age, to put debts behind me would be a relief,” she said, but she wasn’t quite sure how to even get started with a savings plan. That all changed when Sharon attended the Great Lakes Michigan Saves Pay Yourself First Saver’s Summit during America Saves Week.

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Getting Out of Debt

In 2004, Tonya Shelton was facing financial ruin. Barely making more than minimum wage and having lost her home to an unexpected family crisis, Shelton and her family were forced to live in a rundown hotel.

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Developing a Savings "Game Plan"

Eunice Diaz, a teacher in Colorado Springs, had been noticing a pattern. Despite the fact that she and her husband were “making good money,” they were spending their entire earnings and “were still struggling at the end of the month.”

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