Duke/Durham Saves

Duke/Durham Saves is a local initiative dedicated to promoting savings and financial awareness both on Duke's campus and in the local Durham community. Through resources and specialized savings accounts with our partner financial institutions, Duke/Durham Saves believes that anyone can build wealth by developing positive spending and saving habits. In addition, we partner with many local not for profits and other organizations with similar ideals to maximize impact on the community. So don't wait any longer...

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Savings Strategies:

Building wealth starts when you set a goal and make a plan to reach that goal. Whatever goal you choose – whether it’s buying a car, buying a house, or getting out from under your debts – learn about proven savings strategies and get simple tips on the best ways to save. Click on the links below to learn how to:

Duke Financial Economics Center

Learn more about the Duke Financial Economics Center by clicking on the logo below.

 


Contact Us!

Steven Blaser, Executive Director
Duke University
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Duke/Durham Saves


Read the Newsletter

Volume 15, Issue 4 of the American Saver, official newsletter of the America Saves campaign, has been published.

Read the Newsletter

Partner Resource Packet

Want to share savings messages?

Our Partner Resources Packets include a guest post, social media content, and more.

Current Theme: Living at Home: A New Normal for Millennials

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Tip of the Day

  • Keep track of your spending. At least once a month, use credit card, checking, and other records to review what you've purchased. Then, ask yourself if it makes sense to reallocate some of this spending to an emergency savings account. http://ow.ly/sj972

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And if we feature you in our newsletter, you get $25.

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Saver Stories View all »

Developing a Savings "Game Plan"

Eunice Diaz, a teacher in Colorado Springs, had been noticing a pattern. Despite the fact that she and her husband were “making good money,” they were spending their entire earnings and “were still struggling at the end of the month.”

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Getting Out of Debt

In 2004, Tonya Shelton was facing financial ruin. Barely making more than minimum wage and having lost her home to an unexpected family crisis, Shelton and her family were forced to live in a rundown hotel.

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Starting Over

Until last summer, Michael Lindman spent money freely. “I was a union truck driver for 35 years and had a good income,” said Lindman. “I owned my own home, saved a little, and tried to live within my own budget. You always think there’s going to be that much coming in, but things can change in a split second.”

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